Santa Paws at Brontosaurus Saturday 9 December 2017

Santa Pet photos at Brontosaurus

Come and get your photo taken with Santa and your pet on Saturday 9 December from 10am. Call 66524308 to book.

Arlo

Brontosaurus Pet of the Month

Lucky Arlo is our Pet of the Month.
Come on in store Arlo for your FREE dog wash!

With love xx

Responsible pet ownership is the most important aspect in keeping them healthy and safe.

Things to consider when purchasing a pet
  • What type of pet will best suit your environment and lifestyle?
  • Is there adequate space at your home?
  • Is the space secure?
  • Is there adequate shelter?
  • How much time can the family devote to a pet?
  • Will you have time to teach young children about your pet?

Your pets needs

  • Housing– needs to be secure in a confined back yard with shelter provided or on a leash in public areas
  • Feeding– an appropriate balanced diet and clean, cool water at all times
  • Microchipping and registration– all dogs must be microchipped from 12 weeks and all dogs must wear an identification tag when in public which must include name, address and or phone number. This ensures a much greater chance of having a lost pet returned.
  • Vet checks, vaccinations, worming, flea treatment to ensure good health
  • Desexing
  • Grooming
  • Training– ensure pet is socialised, trained and exercised
  • Boarding– pets need to be looked after if you go away on holidays
Let’s get more specific!
Budgies + -

Budgies can live for 15 – 25 years and will grow to approximately 15cm tall.

Budgies love to be stroked, held and want to interact with their owners as much as possible. They require at least 30 minutes or more of daily interaction. They are smart and easily trained. These birds should be taught basic commands such as “step up” onto your hand and “step down” when putting them back into their cage. This will ensure easier handling.

Their friendly, loving personalities make Budgies the most popular companion bird.

BUT please remember that all pets may bite or scratch, and may transmit disease. Keep your pet’s home clean and wash your hands before and after handling your pet or cleaning his home.

Feeding your Budgie – Feed Budgie 1-2 teaspoons per day of a pellet or seed-based Budgie diet. Also, Budgies only eat off the top layer of the food dish, so if feeding seeds, be sure to check the food daily and remove empty seed hulls. About 5-10% of a Budgie’s diet should be bite-sized fruits and veggies like apples, grapes, sweet potatoes, broccoli, spinach and carrots. Offer every 2-3 days. Also be sure to provide a cuttlefish bone in your Budgie’s cage at all times.

Budgies should always have access to clean, fresh water in a bottle or bowl.

  • Signs of a healthy budgie are:
  • Clean, smooth feathers
  • Eats throughout the day
  • Normal droppings that are not runny for more than a couple of days
  • A curious and active disposition
  • Things to watch for (If you notice any of the signs described below, consult your Veterinarian):
  • Decreased appetite; weight loss
  • Decreased activity and grooming behaviour
  • Change in droppings in excess of two days
  • Sitting at the bottom of cage
  • Discharge from nose or mouth; sneezing
  • Feathers fluffed for prolonged periods of time

Your Budgie’s cage must be large enough for them to comfortably stretch her wings, climb and play with their toys. The bigger the cage the better. Minimum cage size is 14″W x 16″L x 16″H. Budgies are very social so they prefer to be kept in pairs or more. Perches in the cage should be at different heights. Cages should be placed away from drafts, smoke & strong odours.

Give your Budgie at least 2-3 toys to keep them busy. But, not too many-they should be able to move about freely without bumping into any in the cage. Rotate toys often to keep them interested.

Budgies can live for 15 – 25 years and will grow to approximately 15cm tall.

Budgies love to be stroked, held and want to interact with their owners as much as possible. They require at least 30 minutes or more of daily interaction. They are smart and easily trained. These birds should be taught basic commands such as “step up” onto your hand and “step down” when putting them back into their cage. This will ensure easier handling.

Their friendly, loving personalities make Budgies the most popular companion bird.

BUT please remember that all pets may bite or scratch, and may transmit disease. Keep your pet’s home clean and wash your hands before and after handling your pet or cleaning his home.

Feeding your Budgie – Feed Budgie 1-2 teaspoons per day of a pellet or seed-based Budgie diet. Also, Budgies only eat off the top layer of the food dish, so if feeding seeds, be sure to check the food daily and remove empty seed hulls. About 5-10% of a Budgie’s diet should be bite-sized fruits and veggies like apples, grapes, sweet potatoes, broccoli, spinach and carrots. Offer every 2-3 days. Also be sure to provide a cuttlefish bone in your Budgie’s cage at all times.

Budgies should always have access to clean, fresh water in a bottle or bowl.

  • Signs of a healthy budgie are:
  • Clean, smooth feathers
  • Eats throughout the day
  • Normal droppings that are not runny for more than a couple of days
  • A curious and active disposition
  • Things to watch for (If you notice any of the signs described below, consult your Veterinarian):
  • Decreased appetite; weight loss
  • Decreased activity and grooming behaviour
  • Change in droppings in excess of two days
  • Sitting at the bottom of cage
  • Discharge from nose or mouth; sneezing
  • Feathers fluffed for prolonged periods of time

Your Budgie’s cage must be large enough for them to comfortably stretch her wings, climb and play with their toys. The bigger the cage the better. Minimum cage size is 14″W x 16″L x 16″H. Budgies are very social so they prefer to be kept in pairs or more. Perches in the cage should be at different heights. Cages should be placed away from drafts, smoke & strong odours.

Give your Budgie at least 2-3 toys to keep them busy. But, not too many-they should be able to move about freely without bumping into any in the cage. Rotate toys often to keep them interested.

Ferrets + -

General

Ferrets are very sociable animals & can make wonderful pets, especially if well-handled and socialised from an early age. They are inquisitive and playful animals with characteristics similar to those of dogs & cats & are easily trained to use a litter box.

They need several hours of supervised exercise & play outside of their cage each day & can be quite mischievous. You need to handle them & give attention to them when they are awake to teach them to play nicely. They can bite if they are not given enough attention. Ferrets get along with cats & most dogs if socialised with them early but should always be supervised. Avoid contact with pet birds, rabbits, guinea pigs, mice & rats.

Feeding

The ferret is a carnivore (meat eater) & should be fed a diet of good quality premium kitten kibble (dry cat food), such as HILLS Science Diet – Feline (available at Brontosaurus).

Water needs to be available at all times for your ferret. DO NOT feed your ferret milk.

Housing

Good size cage is required for your ferret to be in when you are not at home. In the cage you need to include a litter tray & it must be kept clean. Where you house your pet ferret is also important as they are very susceptible to heat stress or stroke; ferrets should be protected from temperatures above 26°C.

Ferrets can escape from even the smallest holes so make sure when you let them out that the space is “ferret proof”. If playing outside they MUST BE in a harness & on a lead.

Provide soft fluffy towels for them to sleep in, or a hammock, soft house or hanging pouch which are available from Brontosaurus.

General Up-keep & Training

When training your ferret DO NOT smack or harm them. They do not learn this way. Simply use a deep voice & stop them doing the act.

Training your ferret to come to the sound of a squeaky toy by rewarding with a treat is a good idea for those times when you can’t find your pet.

Hard plastic toys, dog chews, golf balls, ping-pong balls and cardboard toys are generally suitable.

Health & Well-being

Ferrets have an average life span of 8 years.

They need their claws trimmed regularly & will wiggle & squeal while you do this. Try laying them in your lap with their favourite toy, this should keep them happy.

Desexing: Desexing a jill (female ferret) is recommended before the onset of first oestrus unless you want to breed from her, as female ferrets remain in heat unless mated, & prolonged high levels of oestrogen can result in bone marrow suppression & subsequent death. De-sexing of male ferrets (hobs) is also recommended to control aggressive territorial behaviour and reduce their musky odour.

Ferrets should be vaccinated at eight, 12, and 16 weeks of age against canine distemper – a fatal disease in ferrets. A booster and check-up will also be required once a year. At five-years of age a complete geriatric work-up is recommended for the early detection of heart disease and cancer, commonly seen in older ferrets.

Guinea Pig + -

Traits & Behaviour

You’ll find your new family member to be gentle, sociable, and cheerful. They will enjoy receiving your attention and being in your company and will make happy noises or whistles to show their good mood. They are pretty smart, so the two of you will be learning some tricks together. Guinea Pigs enjoy roommates but make sure you house your guinea pigs with same-sex roommates as the females might become pregnant as young as four weeks.

Introducing your guinea pig to their new home takes a day or two as they will be shy at first, so let them explore the area.  Keep cats and dogs away as your guinea pig will be frightened of them.

Guinea Pigs have a life expectancy of 4-8 years on average.

Housing

  • Choose a cage with low sides so they can see out as they are curious
  • They enjoy an extra storey for further area to explore & a hidey house
  • Use pine shavings or soft bedding layered to a depth of 3.5 to 4cm

Diet

  • Having access to hay is vital & it’s also important to provide some pelleted food
  • Fresh fruits and vegetables using fruit that is low in sugar. Carrots can also be given frequently, as well as celery or beans, but chop them up into 1cm sizes or less.
  • Water- use a drink bottle because water bowls are easily spilled.
  • Vitamin C

Supplies & equipment

  • Nail Cutters & Scissors – Your guinea pigs nails will need to be trimmed monthly.
  • A Hidey House
  • Water Bottle & Ceramic Food Bowl
  • Grooming Brush & Guinea Pig Shampoo – Every 3 months is a good time for a bath.
  • The front teeth never stop growing so they need chews or treat sticks

Symptoms of Illness

  • Running eyes or nose, crust around the eyes or losing excessive amounts of fur  seek veterinary help
Hermit Crab + -

Hermit crabs are a nocturnal crustacean that live on the sea shore.

Tanks for hermit crabs should be lined with shell grit or sand, and should contain both a dish of fresh water and salt water.

Dishes should be plastic, not metal as this can harm the crab. You will need to add water conditioner to your tap water to remove the chlorine.

Hermit crabs eat specially designed food in the form of pellets & crumbles that you will find in store. They can also eat small amounts of fruit & vegetable.

As the hermit crab grows it will need bigger shells, so keep some on hand, you can buy them in our shop or find them on the beach & wash them out very well. Leave them scattered in the tank so the crab can find them when required. Keep the old shells in the tank also as they are a source of nutrition, they will eat them.

The tank must be kept clean at all times, the whole tank should be cleaned every two weeks.

The ideal temperature for the tank is between 24 and 27 degrees.

A water spray bottle should be utilised to dampen the tank regularly to provide a humid environment for the crab.

You can have more than one crab in the tank, but keep them all the same size, larger crabs can be bullies.

Safely interact with dogs + -

A safe way to approach a dog

Walk up calmly and quietly
Stop 3 steps away and ask the owner’s permission
Let the dog smell the back of your hand
Step to the side of the dog and stroke from the collar to the tail

What to do if you are approached by an unknown or angry dog

Stop and stand still
Place your hands down by your side
Stay quiet and look down at the ground

Children should not approach dogs if they are

Sleeping or in their kennel
In a car or on the back of a truck
Behind a fence or gate
Eating
Tied up
Unwell or injured
With their puppies
At parties
Not with their owners

BODY LANGUAGE

Happy relaxed body language

Tail wagging enthusiastically
Tongue hanging out in a relaxed manner
Body relaxed
Head held high

Leave a dog alone if they show the following signs;

Frightened or unsure

Drops tail between legs
Ears are back flat on head
Licks its lips
Rolls over and shows tummy
Tail wagging close to the ground
Trying to look smaller by crouching down

Angry or aggressive

Shows teeth and growls
Makes self look as big as it can
Eyes wide open and staring
Hair on neck and back standing up

Kittens + -

Traits & Behaviour

Kittens love to play and are a very vocal animal known purring. Cats sleep more than most animals with 13–14 hours being the average. Cats are known for their cleanliness, spending many hours licking their coats. Cats may express great affection towards their companions, especially if they are treated with consistent affection from a young age.

The life expectancy of the cat is from 12-18 years.

Health Care

Vaccination-6-8, 12-14 & 16-18 weeks
Worming-Every 2 weeks until 12 weeks of age, then monthly until 6 months, then every 3 months
All kittens need to be microchipped and lifetime registered with local council.
Desexing- Males and females can be desexed from 8 weeks of age.
Flea Control- Should start from a young age. Collars, chews or spot on.
Ticks-  Frontline spray used every 3 weeks & daily grooming

Diet

Your kitten will benefit the most from a balanced high quality diet of the six major nutrient groups: proteins, fats and oils, minerals, vitamins, carbohydrates and water such as

Royal Canin, Advance, or Hills Science Diet.

Fresh water daily is essential, cats like running water.

Supplies

  • Cat bed, scratch post & cat door
  • Super premium food
  • Collar with bell
  • Litter tray, liners, litter scoop & litter
  • Flea, tick & worm treatment
  • Bowls for food and water
  • Toys and teasers
  • Grooming gear

Tips for bringing a new kitten home and settling them as quickly as possible.

  • Spend as much time as possible with your kitten as soon as you get them home.
  • For the first few days, leave your kitten in a quiet place and slowly introduce them to the other rooms in your house.
  • Make sure you kitten proof your home
  • The more human contact the better
  • Playing is important to your pet’s development
  • Establish a grooming routine
  • Keep an eye out for signs of sickness & visit your vet regularly
  • Set ground rules for your kitten’s behaviour, and be consistent in enforcing them.
  •  Begin litter box training immediately!
Rabbits + -

A rabbit’s lifespan is up to 8 years for standard rabbits and up to 12 years for dwarf breeds. They can grow to approximately 8″ long for dwarf rabbits, 12″ or longer for standard rabbits.

Rabbits like company; however, two males together may fight. The best combination is two females from the same family. Male rabbits can be neutered by a veterinarian and then can be housed together or with female rabbits.

Grooming: Rabbits do not need to be groomed or bathed since they are very clean animals and will do their own grooming. However, brushing rabbits with a soft, wire brush will help with any tangles and help with bonding.

Lifting & Handling: Rabbits should not be handled roughly since they are easily excited. They should NEVER be handled by their ears! When picking a rabbit up, place one hand under the rump and back legs, and the other under the chest and front legs. Do not let the back legs kick wildly while being held because they can easily get spinal injury.

De-sexing: Rabbits can be de-sexed as easily as cats, so this option allows them to be kept together without the risk of over population.

Nutrition: Provide your rabbit with free choice of alfalfa hay daily, hay provides the necessary roughage needed to support a healthy digestive system. In addition, a bowl of rabbit pellets should be available. Chopped fruits, carrots, and dark green veggies may be given daily. Take care not to overfeed these fresh foods. They have high moisture content and too much can cause diarrhoea.
Treat sticks & chews – These hard and crunchy treats are yummy and keep your pet’s teeth trimmed. Always keep one in the habitat.
Water – Change and fill your rabbit’s water bottle with clean water every day.

Health: Things to watch for to ensure your rabbit stays healthy

  • Blood in the urine
  • Overgrown front teeth
  • Bare patches in the fur
  • Nails overgrown
  • Sores on feet
  • Diarrhea
  • Lethargic behaviour
  • Weight loss; not eating or drinking normally
  • Sneezing; discharge from the eyes, nose or mouth

If you notice any of the signs described above, please consult your Veterinarian as soon as possible. (Blue & White Vet – 6651 2477)

Housing: Rabbits should be kept in a large hutch; adult rabbits need at least one square foot of cage floor space per pound of body weight. Their bed should be 2-5cm thick, straw or shredded newspaper or a combination of both. The hutch should be kept in a cool, low humidity area, out of direct sunlight.

Siamese fighting fish + -

Diet

Fighters eat flake or pellet foods, freeze dried foods, frozen brine shrimp and frozen beef heart.

Breeding

Fighters have a fairly short lifespan, and are most successful as breeders when they under a year old They breed in bubble nests and do not require a large tank or special equipment.

The male will blow an elaborate bubble nest when he is ready to spawn. As she expels the eggs, they are fertilized and begin to sink. The male will scoop up the eggs and spit them into the nest. From this point on the male will tend the brood. It is advisable to remove the female, as the male may become aggressive towards her as he tends his young.

Habitat/Care

Fighters originate in the shallow waters in Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Vietnam, and parts of China. They live in rice paddies, shallow ponds, and even slow moving streams.

Fighters do well in waters low in dissolved oxygen, as they have a special respiratory organ that allows them to breath air directly from the surface, so Fighters must have access to the water surface to breath air directly from the atmosphere.

Optimally the water for keeping healthy Fighters should be soft, warm, with a neutral to slightly acidic pH. Water movement should be kept to a minimum, which means that power filters and powerheads are not suitable.

Fighters can be kept in a community tank as long as the water conditions are met, and if no aggressive or finnipping fish are present.

However, only one male may be kept in each aquarium, unless they are separated by a barrier.

Females will generally not fight with each other, and may be kept in the same tank.